The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum Forum Index The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum
This discussion forum is hosted by The Guitar ReRanch and was created to serve those interested in the arcane art/science of guitar refinishing and restoration. Those with all levels of experience are welcomed to participate.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Blush Eraser Before Clearcoat

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum Forum Index -> Guitar Finishing and Restoration
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Jib



Joined: 20 Dec 2016
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 4:11 pm    Post subject: Blush Eraser Before Clearcoat Reply with quote

Spraying a pickguard. I wetsanded it to level off some orange peel, then gave it a "field of diamonds" coat of blush eraser (kinda inbetween wet/dry coat).

It seemed to level it off really well. Soon after I decided to give it another coat of clear, and the clear seemed to lay on much smoother.

Just wetsanding before, and shooting clear over it, left me with a considerable amount of orange peel.

The blush eraser seems to have mitigated this a bit, and helped quite a bit, by misting it first thing after wetsanding.

I don't want to get ahead of myself, though, and make this standard procedure just because it worked OK in this one situation.

Thoughts? Wet sand - blush eraser - clear coat to mitigate orange peel?

I used to use the blush eraser *after* the clear coat, but it seems like it works a little better *before* the clearcoat. Could this be my technique or is there anything to this?

Been dealing with major orange peel issues and this seems to have helped a bit and I'm excited, but again...don't want to get ahead of myself.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lon



Joined: 30 Dec 2003
Posts: 6086
Location: Stephenville, TX

PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Being a retarder, it would work either way. Using it before would do what it did for you, by retarding the gassing off thus leveling the top coat more than not. On top coats, if sprayed too much, could cause runs. Misting is the best way. Blushing is removed by slowing the top coat from skinning over and allowing moisture to leach out. Some of us who use spray units will add around 5% retarder to our top coat mix to alleviate any problems during high humidity conditions.

If it worked for you, do it. Just another notch in your belt and addition to your finishing schedule. Congrats
_________________
__________________________________
#313. Praisegig
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jib



Joined: 20 Dec 2016
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lon wrote:
Being a retarder, it would work either way. Using it before would do what it did for you, by retarding the gassing off thus leveling the top coat more than not. On top coats, if sprayed too much, could cause runs. Misting is the best way. Blushing is removed by slowing the top coat from skinning over and allowing moisture to leach out. Some of us who use spray units will add around 5% retarder to our top coat mix to alleviate any problems during high humidity conditions.

If it worked for you, do it. Just another notch in your belt and addition to your finishing schedule. Congrats


Thanks!

Every experience, good and bad, success or mistake, more notches in the belt...gotta keep that in mind. Thanks for that advice Smile

I also found that the blush eraser is good for "opening" the finish to remove dust, fibers, particles, or anything else unwanted that seems to get in during clearcoating.

I used a guitar string (I think this one was a plain steel .015 gauge) to "thread" a fiber out. It seems those plain steel thin strings are good for doing some minimally invasive removal surgery on the finish. The .015 is nice since it doesn't bend so easily, but maybe a short piece of .011 or .012 would be even better. As long as it holds its shape it seems like a good option for threading out stubborn particles/fibers in the clearcoat.

...and then some tweezers to lift it out of the finish. It'll take some wetsanding and more clearcoating to fix it but it's getting there.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum Forum Index -> Guitar Finishing and Restoration All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group