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Very detailed finishing schedule. Worthwhile?

 
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JaminJames



Joined: 07 Sep 2017
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:08 pm    Post subject: Very detailed finishing schedule. Worthwhile? Reply with quote

I found this step by step guide and was curious what others thought of it. Thereís a few more steps than the Reranch 101 guide. Does this seems a bit too intense? Iíd like a nice finish, but Iím not interested in a high gloss finish. Iíll be going for an aged look, slightly dull and worn in, but still very smooth, covering all wood grain. Iíll be finishing in an opaque color. Most likely Olympic White. Iíve included the link to the page as well. This is the simple outline. Following the outline is an extremely detailed step by step of each point on then outline. I tend to like very detailed step by steps because it takes some of guess work out of it. Just donít want to go over board. I donít think the classic guitar makers spent this much time on a finish back in 50s and 60s, and thatís the look Iím going for.

http://www.lmii.com/nitrocellulose-lacquer-solvent-based



LACQUER FINISHING PROCESS - SIMPLE OUTLINE

PREPARATION OF WOOD BEFORE FINISHING

All surfaces must be sanded smooth and scratch-free - Sand to 220grit on hardwoods.
Repeat this sanding process on the softwood top - Sand top to 320 grit.
Totally remove the sanding dust from all surfaces.
Mask off the fingerboard and cover the soundhole.
INITIAL VINYL SEALER WASH COATS

Seal the entire instrument with a wash coat of thinned Vinyl Sealer FLSW32.
Very lightly sand the raised grain roughness from all surfaces with 320 grit paper.
FILL OPEN PORES IN HARDWOODS

Thin the pore filler, so that it is creamier and easier to apply.
Apply the pore filler, use either McFadden's Pore Filler FPF or LMI Pore Filler FMBF8.
Remove excess filler material from surface, leave pores filled.
Seal the surfaces with a coat of Vinyl Sealer.
Repeat the pore filling process. This second pore filling fill any pores missed by the first session.
Re-seal the surfaces with a coat of Vinyl Sealer.
Examine all sealed surfaces very closely for any sandpaper scratches. If scratches are found sand them out now and re-seal the wood.
BUILDING THE CLEAR LACQUER FINISH

Mix a thin lacquer solution.
Spray several coats of thinned clear lacquer to start the process.
Mix the thicker Building lacquer solution.
Spray four (4) coats of Building lacquer.
Sand this coating level with 220 grit sandpaper.
Spray four (4) more coats of Building lacquer.
Sand this coating level with 320 grit paper.
OPTIONAL - Spray another coating of Building lacquer over the back, sides, and neck - if pore depressions are still evident.
Sand this third coating level with 320 grit paper.
Mix the Final lacquer solution - slightly thinner solution with lacquer retarder.
Spray four (4) coats of the thin Final lacquer.
ALLOW THE LACQUER TO FULLY CURE

Guitar factories and small shops will let this lacquer cure anywhere from 4 to 14 days before buffing. We recommend the longer 10 to 14 day cure time for the best results.
FINE SAND THE CURED LACQUER SURFACE

First sanding - Wet sand the entire instrument thoroughly with 600 grit paper
Second sanding - Wet sand with 1200 grit paper, remove all 600 grit sanding marks.
Third sanding - Wet sand with 2000 grit to further smooth the 1200 grit surface.
POLISH THE LACQUER TO A HIGH GLOSS

Use our Fine Polishing Compound FFP and a cotton polishing pad to hand buff/polish the finely sanded semi-gloss surfaces up to a high gloss finish.
Hand polish all surfaces again with Super Fine Polishing Compound FSP to achieve a glass-like ultra-high gloss.
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Lon



Joined: 30 Dec 2003
Posts: 6086
Location: Stephenville, TX

PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try it, you may like it. All of our finishing schedules were probably started like this, then modified and modified again, as you find what works better for you to get to the finished product that satisfies you.

There many changes that I would make to this schedule, but that's through my experience over the years that works for me. To each his own, as if you asked 20 finishers you would get 20 different schedules
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JaminJames



Joined: 07 Sep 2017
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lon wrote:
Try it, you may like it. All of our finishing schedules were probably started like this, then modified and modified again, as you find what works better for you to get to the finished product that satisfies you.

There many changes that I would make to this schedule, but that's through my experience over the years that works for me. To each his own, as if you asked 20 finishers you would get 20 different schedules


Lon wrote:
Try it, you may like it. All of our finishing schedules were probably started like this, then modified and modified again, as you find what works better for you to get to the finished product that satisfies you.

There many changes that I would make to this schedule, but that's through my experience over the years that works for me. To each his own, as if you asked 20 finishers you would get 20 different schedules


Good deal!

I have a question that might help me adjust my schedule as I do my first few finishes. Is there anything dangerous about laying on my first few coats of primer on the thicker side, to build up a little faster? Iím sure theyíll orange peel like crazy, but itíll be sanded flat anyway before the color coats.

In my mind, if each pass/coat is melting in to the next, and there is ample time to dry between coats, it shouldnít effect adhesion or integrity of the primer coat. Is this correct? Iím sure I may find it faster to do more lighter coats and less sanding, than fewer heavier coats and more sanding, but before I try it out, I want to make sure there is nothing inherently incorrect about my assumption.
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Lon



Joined: 30 Dec 2003
Posts: 6086
Location: Stephenville, TX

PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JaminJames wrote:

Good deal!

I have a question that might help me adjust my schedule as I do my first few finishes. Is there anything dangerous about laying on my first few coats of primer on the thicker side, to build up a little faster? Iím sure theyíll orange peel like crazy, but itíll be sanded flat anyway before the color coats.

In my mind, if each pass/coat is melting in to the next, and there is ample time to dry between coats, it shouldnít effect adhesion or integrity of the primer coat. Is this correct? Iím sure I may find it faster to do more lighter coats and less sanding, than fewer heavier coats and more sanding, but before I try it out, I want to make sure there is nothing inherently incorrect about my assumption.


If the surface has been prepped properly, there is no reason to lay primer on thick. Primer is used to create proper adhesion and an even color substrate for the color coats. I usually will apply 2 coats, cure, and level sand to 400. Repeat, and level sand to 600. That should give a smooth surface with even color. This also gives you time to fix any imperfections found before applying color coats.

BTW, primer is a soft material created for easy sanding, so to many coats will cause the color/top coats to cure at different rates, depending where the light/heavy primer coats are located. It is recommended to use no more than 6 primer coats in total. To test your theory, do test panels at different rates of coats, and see what works for you. JMHO, why go against a proven finishing system and risk having to strip when things go wrong.

Maybe others will chime in with their experiences.
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