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clean lines and tape

 
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greens



Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 37
Location: Brooklyn, NY

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 12:32 pm    Post subject: clean lines and tape Reply with quote

Greetings! I've been looking around on the forum for a while and I couldn't find my particular question addressed, although I'm sure it has been so apologies in advance.

I'm painting the face of the headstock black on my LP JR, the rest of which is yellow. I've tried using basic blue painter's tape to mask of the one area from from the side, but I keep getting bleed though.

What is the best way to mask off the yellow sides of the headstock when I'm shooting black? I've seen vinyl tape suggested in some cases, or auto pinstriping tape. I'm using all reranch nitro.

Thanks in advance
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BrightKJ



Joined: 13 Sep 2008
Posts: 342
Location: Midlothian, VA

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try taping it off and shooting a layer of clear first. That will insure that any bleed-through is clear and when you shoot the black, it should leave a nice crisp line.
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greens



Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 37
Location: Brooklyn, NY

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BrightKJ wrote:
Try taping it off and shooting a layer of clear first. That will insure that any bleed-through is clear and when you shoot the black, it should leave a nice crisp line.


Thanks. i didn't realize clear bleed-through would even be visible.


Last edited by greens on Tue Feb 14, 2017 2:49 pm; edited 1 time in total
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BrightKJ



Joined: 13 Sep 2008
Posts: 342
Location: Midlothian, VA

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The clear just fills any gaps first to prevent the black from running into them. It's a lot easier to sand/buff away that little bit of clear than to have the black melt into your yellow.
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greens



Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 37
Location: Brooklyn, NY

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, the black has already gone into the yellow and the yellow into the black. I've been playing whack-a-mole.
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ibanezcollector



Joined: 29 Nov 2006
Posts: 1724
Location: Cleveland OHIO

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

good tape, and making sure its firmly pressed down. I prefer 3M tape myself wont use anything else.

Done entirely with 3M Delicate tape.

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Les



Joined: 06 Jan 2005
Posts: 1961
Location: Kansas City

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The idea of taping and then spraying clear is a good one. The one thing to keep in mind, though, is that there will be a noticable "step" once you've removed the tape.

Another possible solution is to go to an automotive body shop, and ask for some stripe masking tape. It is very thin (means there won't be a lot of build-up of the paint when you remove the tape), and it's pretty sticky (means you have a better chance of avoiding bleed-through).

But the real key is this: Get the tape on just where you want it. Once it's in just the right spot, press it down using a rag. Use a LOT of pressure when running the rag over the tape. You could press it down by hand, but what using the rag does is keep the friction (and resultant heat) at a minimum... and this will create a very tight edge to the masking tape.

Something else that you can do (depending on the finish you want), is to spray very light coats of paint along the masking tape edge first. If the paint is sprayed "lightly", it will tack quicker, and then you can add more paint to get the final result that you're after.

I have extensive experience with restoring and repainting cars. Guitars aren't cars, of course, but these techniques have worked well on both. If you take the time to do all this, you will minimize the chance for bleed-through.

Oh, and the rag technique works well when you're masking off the baseboard, door trim, and window trim in preparation for painting a room in your house.

Good luck!
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