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Epoxy Grainfilling

 
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Joeglow
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Joined: 26 Aug 2003
Posts: 11054
Location: NY/NJ

PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2010 12:26 pm    Post subject: Epoxy Grainfilling Reply with quote

I've gone over almost completely to using Epoxy as a pore fill/sealer. I picked this up from extended discussions among many of the high end acoustic and archtop builders on MIMF, a lot of big builders have gone over to this as their standard finishing procedure. This epoxy thing is killer, after it's done the wood is matt (after sanding) yet mega 3D. The figure has all of it's movement in fact, more but virtually no discernable pores. I could shoot 3 coats of finish on there, ultra thin, buff it out and it would be there all done. Of course in practice putting more lacquer on will continue to heighten the effect, like a magnifying glass. This works great for "problem" woods like figured Mahogany, Walnut, maybe Koa, probably Ash which have figure and don't look good with a traditional pore fill but have deep open pores.

Here's how to do it:
You mix up the Epoxy (5 minute variety) in very small amounts at a time, maybe enough for around 4 square inches tops. I apply it with a single edged razorblade that's had it's corners ground off like this...



Apply the epoxy to the surface and really scrape it in using the razor. Basically try to get as much area coverage as possible and leave as little sitting on the SURFACE as possible. As soon as you feel the stuff even think about setting up, stop, clean off the razor and make some more. You only want to be moving the stuff around while it's still fluid. That's why you make up as little as possible at each go. After you've done the whole surface, leave it for a few hours then sand it flat, I started with 240 Wet and Dry with white spirits as the "wet" component. If you have any ridges it's best to scrape them flat with a fresh box-cutter/Stanley knife blade then sand. This is different to the fullerplast thing in that you don't want a film of it sitting on the surface, rather take it down to the wood which is now impregnated, you can literally polish up the wood with micromesh once it's done.

submitted by John Catto
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