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Relic Q & A Moved here.
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Joeglow
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Joined: 26 Aug 2003
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Location: NY/NJ

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2006 7:46 am    Post subject: Relic Q & A Moved here. Reply with quote

The first few questions are posted here but we should start to keep it on this thread so it will stay at the top. I dragged what I could here but this is the original thread http://reranch.com/reranch/viewtopic.php?t=9070

These are from cbaker:

Q: Can I relic my MIM/MIA/CIJ/MIK Strat/Tele/etc

A: NO. Only a guitar that is finished with lacquer can be correctly reliced. All Fender guitars that you would even consider relicing are too new to be finished with lacquer. Even if they are finished with lacquer, there is a thick layer of poly underneath (52 RI). You can take a belt sander to a poly finished guitar and it will end up looking like a guitar somebody took a belt sander to, not a vintage guitar...

Q: Can I lightly relic my tele hardware so that it looks kind of like brushed aluminium by using muriac (or whatever its called) acid? I wan't a kind of dulled metal look but I don't want the stuff to start getting all rusty on me. Is this do-able, if so what kind of technique should I use?
thanks


A: I have heard you can use muriac acid, but I have used something from Radio Shack called echant solution. It works well on nickel and screws. You need to be careful not to over do it using this solution because it will take the finish completely off. Dip whatever you want to age into it for about 10 - 15 secs and then rinse immediately with water. On chromed stuff, I have lightly scuffed and soaked in a seasalt water solution. Please, if anyone else has any input on this please speak up. Muriac acid might be your best bet, but I have never used it.


Last edited by Joeglow on Sun Sep 03, 2006 9:25 am; edited 3 times in total
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Joeglow
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Joined: 26 Aug 2003
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2006 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jerry68 wrote:

Muriatic acid fumes works well for discoloring nickel, but I have never gotten good results with chrome. Muriatic acid and etching solutions can easily ruin parts so use extreme caution!

For relicing chrome parts, a salt water brine will provide the most realistic results, but requires patience.


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Norman



Joined: 12 Mar 2006
Posts: 519
Location: The Netherlands

PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2006 3:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Got a question:

For aging the fretboard how do you make some spots look like all finish is worn of by the strings and what positions would be more played/worn off??

Norman
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Jerry68



Joined: 08 Feb 2005
Posts: 1990
Location: WNC

PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2006 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Norman wrote:
Got a question:

For aging the fretboard how do you make some spots look like all finish is worn of by the strings and what positions would be more played/worn off??

Norman


A: Again, this is much easier if you have a vintage neck or a good picture of a vintage neck to use as an example. For maple boards, I use fine steel wool to break through the lacquer, it then will use graphite to gray the wood, or my "dirty*" stain mix depending on the effect I am looking to get. Necks wear heavily in the areas they are played the most, and on vintage guitars, that is usually open chords, with heavy emphasis at E, A, D and the 5th position Pentatonic, with lighter wear over the rest of the fretboard. I rarely attempt to relic a rosewood board because sanding divots would be wrong, but occasionally I'll "darken" the heavy play areas...

* You'll have to experiment making your own "dirty" stain formula... My jar has evolved over 10 years and I have no idea what is in it anymore, or the quantities/ratios. "Dirty" stain is great for antiquing.
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fliski guitars wrote:

Its also related to why pickup makers generally don't take other makers who offer things like II/V P90s seriously... it's basically just marketing BS.
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KivaKid



Joined: 15 Aug 2005
Posts: 87
Location: Aurora, CO

PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2006 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

KivaKid's Relic Tip #1

"How to make a white plastic pickguard green/mint"


DISCLAIMER: Please use extreme caution while using the oven, especially for non-food purposes! Keep a current, charged fire extinguisher close at hand! Guitar ReRanch nor I are responsible if anything goes wrong....fire, property damage or otherwise!

Preheat oven to 200F. Fill a pan (sheet pan or deeper that the pickguard will fit into flat) with enough hot water to submerge the pickguard. Add a decent splash of RIT Kelly Green liquid fabric dye, 1/2 ounce or so. Place pickguard body side down in the pan of water so it is submerged. Place in oven and check periodically by taking out the pickguard and running it under water and washing with a washcloth. You can use soap if needed. You can vary the color a bit by adding RIT yellow liquid, and/or dry RIT brown. If color doesn't take, you may need to scuff the pickguard a bit with steel wool.
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Joeglow
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2006 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, I'd like to keep the banter off of this thread and keep it a Q&A about relicing. So if there are tips about relicing that are going to shared place them here. I won't lock the thread because then you can't add questions or get answers but I will edit this thread of off topic material, I hope no one really minds. Thanks to those of you that are adding helpful tips, tricks and ideas about relicing.

Last edited by Joeglow on Wed Sep 06, 2006 10:17 am; edited 1 time in total
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supersam



Joined: 30 Jul 2006
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Location: Lansing, MI

PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've read things about using some sort of rubbing compound for necks that gives it a smooth well played feel. I'm guessing it's like sanding but less harsh. What do you think?
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halfmassive99



Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Posts: 129
Location: chicago

PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

supersam wrote:
I've read things about using some sort of rubbing compound for necks that gives it a smooth well played feel. I'm guessing it's like sanding but less harsh. What do you think?


I am really interested to know more about this as well. I think I may want to try this for the whole body and neck after seeing this quote off of the gvcg site. I don't want a relic or a satin finish but something not too new looking. Any ideas on which products or techniques?

From the gvcg site : "My necks have a beyond incredible feel, as I use only very thin and hard coats of Nitro Lacquer, which I rub out using old world techniques. I do not use successive grades of sandpaper like everyone else because it gives the necks a glassy, "new" feeling."
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Jerry68



Joined: 08 Feb 2005
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 7:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

supersam wrote:
I've read things about using some sort of rubbing compound for necks that gives it a smooth well played feel. I'm guessing it's like sanding but less harsh. What do you think?


I have not, do not, and will never wet sand a neck. I hand rub all of my necks. Your local painters supply store should have rubbing compounds in various grits, coarse thru super fine, just like sand paper The trick is to let the neck cure for a long time (I go 6-12mo's), so the lacquer is nice and hard. Then start with coarse and work your way through the finer and finer compounds, hand rubbing the neck, until you get the feel you like. It is more time consuming, but IMO, it produces a better finish.
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fliski guitars wrote:

Its also related to why pickup makers generally don't take other makers who offer things like II/V P90s seriously... it's basically just marketing BS.
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vegasrock



Joined: 20 Apr 2005
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anybody got any advice on getting an accurate neck color and feel?
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KivaKid



Joined: 15 Aug 2005
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Neck feel is a subjective thing, like size. Different people's playing and chemistry age necks differently as well. But for that overall smooth satin feel, just use some steel wool or wet sanding paper, I'm sure others will comment, too. I used my old '71 P-Bass as an example when I relic'd my Strat. I got very close to the look and feel by rubbing in a mixture of cigar ash and water (not much water). Most of the time, worn maple wood on Fender necks gets a greyish color to it. And no, so far it hasn't worn off during playing. Probably have to have the wood fairly bare to take the ash mixture. I have a pic if needed.
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rjhalsey



Joined: 15 Sep 2005
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

KivaKid wrote:
Neck feel is a subjective thing, like size. Different people's playing and chemistry age necks differently as well. But for that overall smooth satin feel, just use some steel wool or wet sanding paper, I'm sure others will comment, too. I used my old '71 P-Bass as an example when I relic'd my Strat. I got very close to the look and feel by rubbing in a mixture of cigar ash and water (not much water). Most of the time, worn maple wood on Fender necks gets a greyish color to it. And no, so far it hasn't worn off during playing. Probably have to have the wood fairly bare to take the ash mixture. I have a pic if needed.


Graphite powder and mineral spirits applied with 0000 steel wool or a fine scotch brite pad works well also.

-Ralph
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nimhb



Joined: 30 Nov 2005
Posts: 6192
Location: WV at last!

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I copied and pasted this in from another thread.

To age my pickguards I used minwax golden oak stain and dirt.

I only put the min wax on in select places, like around the knobs, screw holes, and areas your hands would touch a lot like around the switch and upper left corner of the guard. I also rub dirt into these areas. Once the min wax dries a little I dab off and rub in. Just kind of gives a dirty, grimy look.

Here's a green guard I did with the golden oak stain and dirt.



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rjhalsey



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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Look here: http://www.graphitestore.com/items_list.asp/action/prod/prd_id/34/cat_id/28
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KivaKid



Joined: 15 Aug 2005
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Location: Aurora, CO

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's the neck I relic'd...

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