The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum Forum Index The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum
This discussion forum is hosted by The Guitar ReRanch and was created to serve those interested in the arcane art/science of guitar refinishing and restoration. Those with all levels of experience are welcomed to participate.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Buffing in relationship to wet sanding

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum Forum Index -> Guitar Finishing and Restoration
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
JaminJames



Joined: 07 Sep 2017
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:29 pm    Post subject: Buffing in relationship to wet sanding Reply with quote

I'm in the process of building my own version of the Stewmac buffer for about 1/4 the cost and just had a quick question about how buffing relates to wet sanding.

I finishing several bodies and on some of them I want a nice glassy, brand new finish. On others I'd hoping for a more satin, aged patina.

Lets say I only wet sand up to an 800. My clear coat is nice and level and all the orange peel has been removed. At this point if I throw it on the buffer and polish out the sanding marks, will the finish still polish up to a high gloss?

I guess what I'm asking is if will the buffer will take the sheen past what the wet sanding achieves, or if the buffer will simply remove my sanding swirls and leave me with a nice satin sheen.

I'm sure the compounds I use on the buffing wheels will make a difference. But, every video I can find or info on the internet pertains to getting a mirror, high gloss finish. So I feel confident on how I'm going to approach that, but I'm still feeling uninformed on how to achieve the aged patina. Should I even use the buffing wheel? It seems like it would be a lot faster for removing my sanding marks, but I don't want it to take it up to far in to gloss territory.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BrightKJ



Joined: 13 Sep 2008
Posts: 342
Location: Midlothian, VA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you buff, it will polish... that's the whole purpose of a buffing wheel.

If you want a flat/satin finish, you can either use a flat/satin clear and end it there or hit it with 0000 steel wool. However, over time, it will likely "shine up" wherever your wear locations are.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ladyfinisher



Joined: 21 Feb 2013
Posts: 398
Location: California

PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The problem with that theory is, unless you sand through all the grits, there will be sanding scratches. If you are using a gloss product, it will want to be gloss. You can knock it down with a sanding pad, but when it gets handled, there will be shiny areas.

I have found that adding a flattening paste to the gloss product is the best way to get satin. I use the gloss almost to the end, wet sand as if I was going to buff, and then spray the product with the flattening agent. It shouldn't need anymore wet sanding.

Ladyfinisher
_________________
CustomGuitarFinishing.com specializing in custom exotic wood guitar body and neck finishing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum Forum Index -> Guitar Finishing and Restoration All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group