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Relic Q & A Moved here.
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cookietruck



Joined: 03 Apr 2009
Posts: 2
Location: austin, texas

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

^ thanks. that's a nice looking pbass there.
that headstock looks about like what my '77 pbass headstock looks like.

on the new neck i guess i'll just spray it clear and let it yellow on its own.
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solderjunkie



Joined: 22 Jun 2011
Posts: 2702
Location: Nastyville TN

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cookietruck wrote:
^ thanks. that's a nice looking pbass there.
that headstock looks about like what my '77 pbass headstock looks like.

on the new neck i guess i'll just spray it clear and let it yellow on its own.


Thanks Cool It's my #1 go-to bass. That's a recent re-fin back to original colors and a new neck. The old neck had a nasty twist... too many years of quick temperature shifts from the van to the venue Wink

Fender only topcoated the headstocks with lacquer starting somewhere in the early 70's... the rest of the neck was poly. I wanted to recreate the original color that my neck had.
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chris jury



Joined: 15 Feb 2010
Posts: 778
Location: seattle

PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

working on a 70s strat. never none any relicing before. Interested in finding a way to get that peeling of the paint I see on that era ...where the yellow fullerplast seems to not bond fully to the paint. Ideas? In art school we'd do that sort of thing with a resist, like rubber cement put down prior to paint.
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cageistherage



Joined: 28 Jul 2012
Posts: 291
Location: TN

PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 4:43 pm    Post subject: advice Reply with quote

i need advice on how to accomplish cracks in the finish such as-

much thanks

private messages also welcome
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Groveness



Joined: 12 Aug 2007
Posts: 876
Location: Brooklyn, NY. by way of New Brunswick, NJ. by way of Richmond, Va.

PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi there Findyourrest, my understanding of how checking works is that the finish and wood beneath will expand and contract at different rates with changes in temperature which stresses the finish to the point of cracking in certain places, i.e. checking. So with that in mind, something that a lot of folks here will do to induce checking is to expose your finished piece to cold, then hot, then cold, then hot again quickly. My method, which I owe thanks to somebody on Reranch for is to throw my piece in the freezer and let it sit there for a few hours, then remove it, then place it in again until I've got the desired result.

There are a couple of things to keep in mind however: many modern lacquer formulations include agents that make the lacquer elastic and therefore much harder to check., so you'll want to look around for a brand with few to no plasticizers added. Also, lacquer tends to harden and become increasingly brittle over it's lifetime, which is why we see checking in older guitars primarily, and this sort of hardening takes some time. This means that a brand new finish, even one sprayed with a no-plasticizer lacquer might not yet be ready to check very well.

I recommend you clear out some space in your freezer, take your project apart and give it some time in the chiller. Hopefully you'll get some sweet results straight away, more likely it'll take a few sessions, and possibly it might not even happen at all, but your project shouldn't be hurt as a result.

Lastly, there are folks who have a crazy fortitude that I don't possess, and they can summon the patience to carve out their own checking lines with a razor blade. Some people are really good at this, but most aren't. This method has always struck me as madness given how much time, patience, and vision is involved, but you might be the kind of guy who would dig it. When it's done well, razor checking looks great because it looks like checking. When done poorly, which again it most often is, it looks like someone keyed your guitar with a razor blade.

So there you have it, a couple of options and the underlying theory. I hope that helps, and goodluck!
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74 Strat



Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 5639

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have done the freezer trick that Josh had mentioned. It works great, but also, like he said, it will heal itself if it isn't cured long enough. I like using Watco clear lacquer for aged looking guitars as it cures quicker and harder than others. It also yellows faster. All of these pluses are also the minuses when using Watco for a pristine looking axe. Anyway, Watco can be had at most hardware stores. you cannot get it in the bigger chains though. Good luck and post pics...Dean
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BartMan



Joined: 29 Mar 2010
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2012 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
Could somebody educate me on how to attain this kind of aging on the back of the neck please? What material should I use to stain it with to attain the brownish tint? What's the next process after area sanding the finish? Thanks.



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Sasscaster



Joined: 28 Mar 2005
Posts: 185
Location: HO-scale passenger in Iowa City

PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2013 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CHECKING OBSERVATION-
My Micawber relic has a thin-skin for tone. Firm believer in letting the wood speak for itself, but also for quicker wear n' tear. I've done the freezer-dunk-overnight-in-July-heat-for-natural-checking method, but it did little- so I resorted to the compressed-air trick. That does do it nicely on the front where it was a little thicker for getting the butterscotch color down right (RR blonde then RR tinted clear over it for the correct shade), but not on my sides and back. Those look good for a few hours then heal. And this is on a guitar that has ReRanch nitro for maybe 4 years.
So, my evaluation says the thicker the nitro (specifically ReRanch Nitro from ca. 2008) the better the checking.

Doesn't this go contrary to historical Fender accounts of thin nitro finishes (to save cost vis-a-vis using less nitro/workhours, and hense the nice worn look of a 50's Tele)???

Bottom line- if you want some nice checking you should go with a thicker clear finish.
Correct?
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Drappoc



Joined: 02 Mar 2013
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat Mar 09, 2013 11:38 am    Post subject: What to do first? Reply with quote

Ok so I am about to paint my strat with a 3 tone sunburst Re-Ranch aerosol cans (arrived in the mail yesterday).

After I paint it I understand it needs to cure for a while..... I have a few questions.

1. How long do I leave it to cure before starting the relicing process? ( I don't need to relic the hardware as the original guitar was 30 years old so the metal parts are nicely rusted)

2. As this is going to be an extreme relic ..... (Think Rory Gallagher's 61 Strat here) should I do the freezer checking (or compressed air) before or after I remove the unwanted Finish.

3. If I have to wait for the nitro to harden before doing the relicing how long do I need to wait before I can put it back together and use it.

(I am planning on playing the guitar as I wait for the nitro to cure enough for checking)

Thank you all in advance
[img][/img]
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Drappoc



Joined: 02 Mar 2013
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat Mar 09, 2013 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BTW here is a pic of Rory with his axe.....I am hoping to achieve something along these lines.... Not an exact replica but in the spirit of kind of effect.
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thesjkexperience



Joined: 21 Jun 2012
Posts: 149
Location: Gunbarrel, Colorado

PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2013 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I want to do the same thing, but I probably won't get to it until next year at the rate I am going and the weather not cooperating.

In the early 90s I built some 3.5 to 4 foot long skateboards I called Terra-Surfers so my wife and I could keep our surfing balance in a place about as far from the ocean as you can get lol! The kids in the neighborhood and then a ski shop wanted me to make them some.

My neighbor was a trained artist and he had some clear sheet that looked like food plastic wrap with a gentle but firm adhesive. He was then able to control what areas got what color(s) in a way that was almost like block printing. I need to go to the University Art Hardware Store and find that stuff. You could lay it over the body and unmask the areas where you want the sunburst to be on the wood. Then just spray a 1961 style sunburst and a week or so later pull off the mask.

The tricky part is the eagle's head on the top horn as that is the most distinctive area of paint. Fender must have had some precut stencils for the Rory signature model as the paint just under his forearm in the photo above is always rotated too far clockwise on the body ending up on the arm contour. If you you took a photo of the guitar and lay out a grid over it it is easy to see the paint (I am talking about) does not go above or beyond the input jack and on Fender it can be almost at 11 o'clock when looking at the guitar in playing position.
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mat721



Joined: 11 Sep 2012
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2013 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello everyone,

I just have a little question about the aging process for all the hardware parts (bridge, tuners,...).

I use to do the "acid technique" but I'm not completely satisfied with the result especially on the chrome parts and I would like to find another technique which would be better for the environment.

Thank you very much in advance for all your tricks and technique to get great relic parts without acid or other toxic products.

Mat
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egrier



Joined: 15 Oct 2013
Posts: 1
Location: United States

PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 3:59 pm    Post subject: SRV Lenny body finish Reply with quote

Hi, first post here. I am building a SRV "Lenny" guitar and have an unfinished alder body that I want to use for the project. I want to create the chipped areas of finish throughout the body of the guitar. The largest being by the tremolo cover. My question is, should I finish the whole body and the ctreate the various nick, gouged, chips, etc. Or would it be feasible to tape off those areas and finish over the top of them and then remove the tape. Bear with me this is my first relic project but I want it to look decent. Would you finish it with a water based dye and lacquer or oil based stain like Minwax or something. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
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Strat edgy



Joined: 01 Apr 2012
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Guys, What is/are the best, tried and true methods of achieving that green, yellowing that happens to Fender Blue colors? The relic I'm currently doing is a severely trashed sonic blue Tele.
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Tha LowEnd Theory



Joined: 26 Feb 2008
Posts: 4953
Location: Valley Ranch, Texas

PostPosted: Sat Jan 11, 2014 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Strat edgy wrote:
Hi Guys, What is/are the best, tried and true methods of achieving that green, yellowing that happens to Fender Blue colors? The relic I'm currently doing is a severely trashed sonic blue Tele.


Tinted clear used sparingly. I prefer to make my own by putting some clear in a glass jar and exposing it to sunlight for 1-3 weeks. The longer it sits the yellower it gets.
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It will be shiny, and a pretty color, but underneath it's still a turd." ~Houndog

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